Hooked Rugs may be used in a variety of uses around the home.  They add warmth and charm to any space. 

How to make a hooked rug



step five


prep for finishing


After the rug is finished it's time to prep for finishing the outside edge.  This assures the outside edges of your rug are sturdy which cuts down on wear and tear. Measure 1 1/4" from the last row hooked and draw a straight line all around and miter the corners.  Cut on the line and zig zag stitch with sewing machine to prevent fray.  Time to select a finishing method.

step one


Select a pattern or draw your own design


Choose a pattern you find visually pleasing.  Beginners should start with a smaller project to see if hooking is something you enjoy.  I sell patterns in my ETSY shop.  

ETSY SHOP 

step six


Finish the edges


There are several methods to finishing a rug such as whip stitch with wool yarn or fabric strips but I prefer crochet method for it's interesting weave.  I use the entire width of wool from the bolt (60") and cut 10 inches and dye it to match the rug.  The wool is then cut using #8.  Using my hook I crochet around the entire rug.  Coming soon.... video on crochet rug finishing.

step three 


Cut the wool into strips


Special machines are used to cut wool into a variety of widths used for hooking rugs.  The handle on the right turns the blade as the fabric moves through.  A variety of cutter head widths are available.  Frazier cutters are available at www.fraserrug.com.  Wool cutters are very expensive and there are alternatives to using a machine.  Contact me and I'll give you my method used prior to investing in a cutting machine.

Woolen folk art 

step seven


Stand back and enjoy YOUR BEAUTIFUL HOOKED RUG !


step tWO


Select wool colors


I like to think of hooking as coloring within the lines using the wool as your medium.  Using different colors in plaid and solid give the rug added dimension.  While selecting wool think of contrast (light to dark) as another element to your design.  Some rugs use colors close in value for a softer look, while using black to white and everything in-between gives a sharp contrast.  Have FUN!!!!

​SAMPLE SETS

Darci Spilman / fiber Artist

step four


hooking


The concept is simple, easy to learn, and repetitive once you get the hang of it. Use a rug hooking  frame or hoop to secure your pattern.   Hooks are used to bring wool up through the foundation cloth.   Working from underneath hold one strand of wool and pull up through a hole in the foundation cloth, this is called a tail.  Move down a couple more spaces and pull up a another loop.  Continue until strand runs out or you finish filling in the color.  End with another tail.  Cut off tails even with loops.